Monday, January 28, 2013

Quick Scrambled Eggs

This is such a quick, easy, tasty, and healthy way to start the morning, especially during the week, that I just had to add it here. It's high on protein (which I understand to be a great nutritional asset in the morning as it alleviates hunger efficiently through the rest of the day), takes more time to clean up after than even to make, and goes great with toast and butter.

Eggs with milk and seasoning

whisked

butter and oil in the skillet

cooking

flipped

Total Prep Time: 10 minutes
Active Prep Time: 10 minutes
Serves: 1
Tools: non-stick skillet, bowl, fork, plastic (or wooden) spatula

Ingredients:
2 eggs
1-2 teaspoons milk
1 tablespoon unsalted butter
1 tablespoon grapeseed oil
1 teaspoon fresh thyme leaves or 1/2 teaspoon dried thyme
kosher salt
fresh-cracked black pepper

Directions:
Heat a non-stick skillet over medium-high heat.
Crack the eggs into a small bowl (I follow Jacques P├ępin who advises to not crack eggs on the side of a bowl but on the counter). Add the milk and seasonings to the bowl then whisk well with a fork to combine the ingredients.
Add the butter and oil to the skillet. Once the butter has melted, pick up the pan and swirl the oil and butter to coat its entire surface. Bring the flame under the skillet down to low and pour in the egg. Allow to set for about 30 seconds then use the spatula to pull back what of the egg has firmed allowing the liquid still on the coagulating egg to fall out to the far side of the pan. Do this a few times over the following minute or so until no liquid remains. Insert the spatula under the eggs a couple times while they cook to guarantee that they don't stick. Flip the egg over to heat but remove quickly before cooking for too long. The entirety of the cooking should take about 90 seconds to 2 minutes.
Empty the egg onto a plate and serve.

This took me a few times to get it right - to not over- or under-cook the egg but the general technique works fine. The combination of the milk, grapeseed oil, and butter seems to impart a fluffy sweetness to the eggs. The main idea is to get the seasoning correct and not to do too much - the skillet, heat, and egg seem to know how to do this more or less on their own.